Walk Through the Delaware Valley's Rich Revolutionary War History

Hike, bike, and drive following Generals Washington and Howe to explore the region’s Revolutionary War History with this informative map. The routes shown depict the American and British troop movements from the British landing on the Elk River near Elkton, MD (August 25, 1777) to the capture of Philadelphia (September 26, 1777) culminating with the American winter encampment at Valley Forge and the British occupation of Philadelphia (winter 1777-1778). Featured with the troop movements are over 330 miles of regional multi-use trails and greenways including the 3,000-mile-long East Coast Greenway and the 195-mile Mason-Dixon Trail. More than 25 popular parks and preserves that offer local trails are also included, from interpretive park locations such as the Brandywine Battlefield Park in Chadds Ford to Fort Mifflin in Philadelphia.

Wilmington Area Trails

East Coast Greenway
Stretching from Maine to Florida, this 3,000-mile long walking and biking route passes near the Battle of Cooch's Bridge in Delaware, through the streets of historic Philadelphia, and continues north along the Delaware River.

Mason-Dixon Trail
This 196-mile natural surface footpath begins in Chadds Ford, PA near the Brandywine River Museum of Art and the Brandywine Battlefield Park, crosses into Delaware and Maryland and then ends in Cumberland County, PA.

Brandywine Trail
Beginning near the Brandywine Battlefield Park, this 27-mile trail provides a recreational hiking path that will eventually connect Wilmington, DE to the Appalachian Trail via the Horse-Shoe Trail.

Michael N. Castle Trail/ Ben Cardin Recreational Trail
A 14-mile shared-use paved trail that connects Delaware City, DE with Chesapeake City, MD, this trail extends through almost 5,000 acres of the C&D Canal Conservation Area, along the north bank of the C&D Canal.

More Hiking in Greater Wilmington

Explore a National Historic Trail

The Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route comprises over 680 miles of land and water trails, and hundreds of historical sites from Massachusetts to Virginia. We invite you to explore a small portion of the trail as it passes through northern Delaware, including the Hale-Brynes House. This historic site was once used by General Washington for a war council meeting to discuss the defense of Philadelphia in September 1777. Download Delaware's Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route Guide